About

Aichi Arts Center

The Aichi Arts Center is a cultural complex that was opened in the center of Nagoya City in 1992 to act as a base for art and culture in Aichi Prefecture. It comprises the following facilities: the Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art, which houses a rich collection of work from Japan and abroad, with a focus on 20th century art; the Aichi Prefectural Art Theater, which includes the Main Theater, Concert Hall, and Mini Theater; and the Aichi Prefectural Arts Promotion Service, which consists of an Art Space, Art Library, and Art Plaza.

Courtesy of Aichi Arts Center

Artists exhibiting at the Aichi Arts Center

Artists performing at or nearby the Aichi Arts Center

Artists exhibiting/presenting results of research projects’ at the Aichi Arts Center

Ichinomiya City

Ichinomiya City (population approx. 380,000) is located in the Owari area in northwest Aichi. The city’s name, literally “first shrine,” comes from Masumida Shrine, which was the highest-ranked shrine in former Owari Province. In the Edo period, Ichinomiya flourished as a producer of cotton fabrics, later converting to silk-cotton fabrics and wool and becoming known as “Ichinomiya, city of textiles.” Exhibitions will be held in the Orinasu Ichinomiya and former Ichinomiya Central Nursing School near Ichinomiya Station, as well as in the Sumi Memorial Hall, the only Kenzo Tange-designed building in the prefecture, and other venues in the Bisai area.

Artists exhibiting in Ichinomiya City

Tokoname City

Tokoname (population approx. 60,000), located on the west coast of the Chita Peninsula, is one of Japan’s six ancient pottery kiln sites (along with Seto, Shigaraki, Echizen, Tamba, and Bizen), known since the Heian period for its “Kotokoname” pottery. Changing with the times to produce teapots in the Edo period and clay pipes and tiles since the Meiji period, ceramics remains the town’s main industry. Exhibits are planned for the former Pottery Factory, the Takita Family Residence (old shipping family), centering on the “Pottery Footpath,” which retains the atmosphere of the early Showa period, and the INAX Museums.

Artists exhibiting in Tokoname City

Arimatsu, Nagoya City

Located in southeastern Nagoya City, Arimatsu is a town along the Tokaido established by the Owari feudal domain in 1608. Known for Arimatsu-Narumi Shibori, the town retains the feel of Edo-period ukiyo-e landscapes and conveys traditional culture in the form of its townscape and festival floats. Arimatsu has been designated an important cultural property by the city of Nagoya and Japan’s Agency for Cultural Affairs. Exhibits will be held in historic buildings and workshops along the Tokaido.

Artists exhibiting in Arimatsu, Nagoya City

Access

Access to Aichi Prefecture (Nagoya Sta.)

By Train

From Tokyo

Tokyo Sta.

1hr. 40min.

Nagoya Sta.

JR Tokaido-Shinkansen, NOZOMI Super Exp./Approx.

From Osaka

Shin-Osaka Sta.

50min.

Nagoya Sta.

JR Tokaido-Shinkansen, NOZOMI Super Exp./Approx.

By Air Plane

Chubu Centrair
International
Airport

28min.

Meitetsu
Nagoya Sta.

Meitetsu (Nagoya Railroad) Airport Line,
μ-SKY Limited Exp./Approx.

Nagoya Airport

30min.

Nagoya Sta.

Aoi Kotsu (Aoi Traffic Corp inc.), Airport shuttle/ Approx.

Access from Nagoya Sta. to each venue

To Ichinomiya City

Meitetsu
Nagoya Sta.

14min.

Meitetsu
Ichinomiya Sta.

Meitetsu (Nagoya Railroad) Nagoya Line,
Limited Exp./Approx.

Nagoya Sta.

9min.

Owari-
Ichinomiya Sta.

JR Tokaido Line, New Rapid/Approx.

To Tokoname City

Meitetsu
Nagoya Sta.

35min.

Tokoname Sta.

Meitetsu (Nagoya Railroad) Tokoname Line,
Limited Exp./Approx.

To Arimatsu (Nagoya City)

Meitetsu
Nagoya Sta.

30min.

Arimatsu Sta.

Meitetsu (Nagoya Railroad) Nagoya Line,
Local or Semi Exp./Approx.

Located in the center of Japan and blessed with marine and mountainous natural environments, Aichi is the fourth most populous prefecture in Japan (with 7.52 million inhabitants as of July 2021).
Aichi is known for its manufacturing industry (producing cars, robots, textiles, ceramics, and the like)but, in fact, it also has a thriving agricultural industry, producing more flowers than any other prefecture in Japan.
This is also a region that produced many of the military generals who influenced Japan’s history in the Sengoku (“Warring States”) period (c. 16th century). As well as the townscapes still lining roads that have served people and goods since long ago, and traditional crafts such as Shibori (tie-dye) and pottery, the area’s unique culinary culture also contributes to its charm — examples include Nagoya meshi 1 and the luxurious “morning service”2 at coffee shops.

  • 1 A general term for the unique meals and sweets eaten widely, at home and at restaurants, in the area around Nagoya in Aichi.
  • 2 Morning service refers to the offer of food such as bread or eggs for free or at a discounted price when ordering a drink at a coffee shop during morning hours.